We are an organic clothing company driven by higher values.

love@ideologie-organic.com
+1 31 3310 1107
CHOICE - GR
CHOICE - GR

29.99

new arrival
UNITY - WHB
UNITY - WHB

29.99

new arrival
W VNECK - GR
W VNECK - GR

24.99

new arrival
UNITY - GR
UNITY - GR

29.99

new arrival

BLOG

The Philosophy of Deep Ecology Picture 1226

Leave your comment

June 2, 2011 - 7:26 am

The collective intelligence of the Web has come up with a a set of principles -an axiomatical stepping ground- by which to forma a new ecological paradigm. In 1973 the late Norwegian philosopher Arne Naess coined the term “deep ecology” in order to recognize the inherent worth of all living things, aside from their utility. This view has lead to important developments in animal rights, forest preservation, and general planetary consciousness. Before Naess, system theorist an futurist Buckminister Fuller shaped the idea of Earth as a spacechip in which every living thing is part of the crew (none is only a passenger), outlining the concept of holistic interdependency. The work of biologist James Lovelock, author of The Gaia Hypothesis, has further advanced upon this view, triggering a world wide ecological movement with a philosophical underpinning that sees Earth as a living (and perhaps intelligent) being.

This planetary consciousness is endogenous to native cultures and can be seen in different manifestations. One radical example is the new Mother Earth Law pronounced in Bolivia, which givers nature (animals, plants and minerals) and humans equal rights.

Although there has been an enormous evolution in ecological awareness in the last decades, there is still a great gap to fill. Expounding on the views on the philiosphy of Naess and Lovelock the following principles could serve as a theoretical guideline to lobby balance in the world and root deep upon ancient wisdom flashed-forward to serve the present plight of the planet.

1. Holism. Nature is seen holistically, as an integrated system, rather than as a collection of individual things. The “oneness” of nature, however, is not monistic, denying the reality of individuals and difference. Rather, the natural world consists of an organic wholeness, a dynamic field of interaction of diverse species and their habitats. In fact, that diversity is essential to the health of the natural world.

2. No ontological divide. Humans are fully a part of nature, and there is no ontological separation between our species and other ones.

3. Self. Individually, each person is not an autonomous individual but rather a self-in-Self, a distinct node in the web of nature.

4. Biocentric egalitarianism. Nature has unqualified intrinsic value, with humans having no privileged place in nature’s web. Emphasis is placed on value at holistic levels, such as populations, ecosystems, and the Earth as a whole, rather than individual entities.

5.Intuition. A sensuous, intuitive communion with the Earth is possible, and it gives us needed insight into nature and our relationship to it. Scientific knowledge is necessary and useful, but we need a holistic science that recognizes the intrinsic value of the Earth and our interdependence with it.

6.Environmental devastation. Nature is undergoing a cataclysmic degradation, an ecological holocaust, at the hands of human societies.

7. Anti-anthropocentrism. This destructiveness is rooted in anthropocentrism, an arrogant view that we are separate from and superior to nature, which exists to serve our needs.

8. An ecocentric society. The goal at a social level is a society that is based on an ecocentric view of nature and that lives in harmony with the natural tendencies and the limits of natural world.

9. Self-realization. The goal at an individual level is to fully realize one’s identification with nature. This involves neither a sense of an independent self nor the loss of the self in the oneness of nature. Self-realization is the full awareness of the self-in-Self.

10. Intuitive morality. The moral ideal, then, does not involve ethics in the traditional sense of a separate self rationally deriving principles of how we ought to behave. Rather, it is a realization of our identification with nature which yields a spontaneous, intuitive tendency to avoid harm and to flourish. As John Seed has said of his work on the rainforest, “I am the rainforest defending itself.

 

Latest comments
  • Hello, I would like to invite you to check us out for a moment, we are WhosGreenOnline.com, an online Green directory designed for eco-friendly companies, services and products just like yours. Our vision is to become the premiere online Green directory. As we all know the Green Revolution is upon us, please give us a look and don’t miss the oppurtunity to show the world your true colors. 

    Thank You for your consideration and please feel free to contact us with any questions. 

  • Ab fab my gloody man.

Sing up for our newsletter: